Top Jobs in Florida for 2012

See our other posts on the top jobs in various states.

OVERVIEW

In this post, we use Analyst (EMSI’s web-based labor market analysis tool) to pinpoint the best jobs in Florida for 2012. We’ll be scouting out three main criteria: (1) pay, (2) growth since 2007 (when the economy tanked), and (3) concentration.

Our observations are based solely on labor market data from EMSI’s 2011.4 Complete Employment release, which is drawn from 80+ state and federal data sources, and includes workers not covered by unemployment insurance (e.g., self-employed workers). Keep in mind — because of the time lag in Bureau of Economic Analysis releases, our most recent years of proprietor data (2010-2011) are still estimates.

So what is the overall job picture in Florida? Since 2007, jobs have dipped from 10.5 million to just over 10 million. That’s a loss of 446,000 jobs, or 4.3%. (This factors in the slight increase in jobs during 2010-11.) Current estimates put unemployment at 970.7K out of a population of 19 million. Average earnings for a Florida employee are $45K a year. In 2010, there were approximately 291,000 completions in higher ed programs.

HIGHEST-PAYING

The following table gives us the highest-paying jobs in the state — i.e., jobs that pay over $40 an hour (2011 median hourly wage). Not surprisingly, there’s a cluster of healthcare-related jobs near the top: physicians & surgeons ($69.84), oral & maxillofacial surgeons ($69.25), orthodontists ($62.76), pharmacists ($51.56), and dentists (general) ($49.07). Outside the healthcare sphere, the biggest wages go to airline pilots, copilots, & flight engineers ($62.91), air traffic controllers ($52.24), and engineering managers ($49.58).

SOC Code Description 2007 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change % Change 2007 National Location Quotient 2012 National Location Quotient 2011 Median Hourly Wage 2011 Avg Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Complete Employment – 2011.4
29-1069 Physicians and surgeons 41,684 45,373 3,689 9% 0.89 0.95 $69.84 $74.00 First professional degree
29-1022 Oral and maxillofacial surgeons 463 472 9 2% 1.02 1.03 $69.25 $81.65 First professional degree
53-2011 Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers 3,236 3,418 182 6% 0.66 0.74 $62.91 $79.12 Bachelor’s degree
29-1023 Orthodontists 318 320 2 1% 0.67 0.67 $62.76 $74.55 First professional degree
53-2021 Air traffic controllers 1,782 2,035 253 14% 1.34 1.39 $52.24 $51.98 Long-term on-the-job training
29-1051 Pharmacists 16,673 17,194 521 3% 1.08 1.12 $51.56 $50.78 First professional degree
29-1021 Dentists, general 7,068 7,145 77 1% 0.94 0.95 $50.73 $57.15 First professional degree
11-9041 Engineering managers 5,059 4,511 (548) (11%) 0.45 0.45 $49.58 $52.04 Degree plus work experience
29-1029 Dentists, all other specialists 304 318 14 5% 0.72 0.72 $49.07 $56.37 First professional degree
11-3041 Compensation and benefits managers 1,989 1,937 (52) (3%) 0.89 0.91 $45.64 $48.66 Degree plus work experience
11-2022 Sales managers 19,935 19,195 (740) (4%) 0.84 0.85 $45.36 $50.82 Degree plus work experience
11-9121 Natural sciences managers 833 929 96 12% 0.31 0.34 $44.55 $49.48 Degree plus work experience
11-3021 Computer and information systems managers 9,329 9,314 (15) 0% 0.49 0.51 $44.08 $47.93 Degree plus work experience
29-1024 Prosthodontists 83 91 8 10% 1.61 1.66 $43.64 $52.71 First professional degree
11-1011 Chief executives 37,473 38,411 938 3% 1.04 1.06 $43.45 $45.93 Degree plus work experience
19-2012 Physicists 336 368 32 10% 0.38 0.41 $42.24 $50.31 Doctoral degree
11-3011 Administrative services managers 9,762 9,484 (278) (3%) 0.65 0.65 $41.15 $43.53 Degree plus work experience
29-1131 Veterinarians 3,749 3,952 203 5% 1.02 1.02 $40.96 $46.46 First professional degree
29-1071 Physician assistants 3,692 4,304 612 17% 0.84 0.88 $40.47 $41.42 Master’s degree
Total 163768 168771 5003 0.03 52.47 56.02

Other interesting facts that we should note:

  • Physicians & surgeons has added the most jobs from 2007 to 2011 — close to 4,000 new jobs.
  • Physician assistants has the best proportional growth — up 17% (600 new jobs).
  • Air traffic controllers has the highest concentration with an LQ (location quotient) of 1.39. (LQ is a way of measuring the concentration or specialization of a job in a particular region. The national average for LQ is 1.00. The higher the LQ, the more unique the job is to that area. For more on concentration, click here.)
  • Nine of the 19 jobs on this chart are healthcare-related (SOC code 29), and all nine have grown since 2007, if only by a little — such as oral & maxillofacial surgeons (9 new jobs, +2%) and orthodontists (2 new jobs, +1%).
  • Seven jobs are management occupations (SOC code 11), but most of these are in decline. Chief executives (1,000 new jobs) and natural sciences managers (100 new jobs) have done okay, but the other five are going down — such as sales managers (-740 jobs, -4%) and engineering managers (-548, -11%).
  • A big chunk of the the jobs here require either a first professional degree or a degree plus work experience. Only three of them require a master’s degree (physician assistants), a bachelor’s degree (airline pilots), or long-term on-the-job training (air traffic controllers).

A few explanations might be helpful (gathered from the Bureau of Labor Statistics):

Natural sciences managers plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields.

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons perform surgery on mouth, jaws, and related head and neck structure to execute difficult and multiple extractions of teeth, to remove tumors and other abnormal growths, to correct abnormal jaw relations by mandibular or maxillary revision, to prepare mouth for insertion of dental prosthesis, or to treat fractured jaws.

Prosthodontists construct oral prostheses to replace missing teeth and other oral structures to correct natural and acquired deformation of mouth and jaws, to restore and maintain oral function, such as chewing and speaking, and to improve appearance.

FASTEST-GROWING

To find the fastest-growing jobs, we’ll split our study into two angles: one looking at the occupations that have added the highest number of new jobs, and another looking at the occupations with the greatest proportional growth. (Note: We’re limiting our analysis to the jobs that pay over $30 an hour and employ 1,000+ people. We’re also excluding educational occupations.)

So which occupations have added the most jobs since 2007?

SOC Code Description 2007 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change % Change 2007 National Location Quotient 2012 National Location Quotient 2011 Median Hourly Wage 2011 Avg Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Complete Employment – 2011.4
29-1069 Physicians and surgeons 41,684 45,373 3,689 9% 0.89 0.95 $69.84 $74.00 First professional degree
23-1011 Lawyers 55,079 57,826 2,747 5% 1.07 1.15 $36.10 $43.90 First professional degree
29-1123 Physical therapists 12,340 14,296 1,956 16% 1.11 1.16 $33.15 $34.15 Master’s degree
15-1031 Computer software engineers, applications 21,235 22,296 1,061 5% 0.68 0.68 $34.31 $36.49 Bachelor’s degree
11-1011 Chief executives 37,473 38,411 938 3% 1.04 1.06 $43.45 $45.93 Degree plus work experience
29-1122 Occupational therapists 6,621 7,528 907 14% 1.05 1.09 $31.01 $30.90 Master’s degree
29-1071 Physician assistants 3,692 4,304 612 17% 0.84 0.88 $40.47 $41.42 Master’s degree
29-1051 Pharmacists 16,673 17,194 521 3% 1.08 1.12 $51.56 $50.78 First professional degree
19-1042 Medical scientists, except epidemiologists 2,749 3,250 501 18% 0.45 0.48 $30.19 $34.86 Doctoral degree
Total 197547 210481 12934 0.07 45.42 49.24

Physicians & surgeons takes an overwhelming lead with close to 4,000 new jobs. After that come lawyers (2,800), physical therapists (2,000), computer software engineers (applications) (1,000), and chief executives (1,000).

Other noteworthy details:

  • Five of the nine jobs are related to healthcare.
  • Physical therapists (LQ 1.16) and lawyers (1.15) have the highest concentration.
  • Lawyers have the biggest total number of jobs: 58,000.

A couple more descriptions:

Medical scientists (except epidemiologists) conduct research dealing with the understanding of human diseases and the improvement of human health. Engage in clinical investigation or other research, production, technical writing, or related activities. Includes medical scientists such as physicians, dentists, public health specialists, pharmacologists, and medical pathologists.

Occupational therapists assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that help restore vocational, homemaking, and daily living skills, as well as general independence, to disabled persons.

Now let’s turn to the jobs that have grown by the greatest percentage. Topping the chart with 18% growth is medical scientists (except epidemiologists), followed by physician assistants (17%) and physical therapists (16%).

SOC Code Description 2007 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change % Change 2007 National Location Quotient 2012 National Location Quotient 2011 Median Hourly Wage 2011 Avg Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Complete Employment – 2011.4
19-1042 Medical scientists, except epidemiologists 2,749 3,250 501 18% 0.45 0.48 $30.19 $34.86 Doctoral degree
29-1071 Physician assistants 3,692 4,304 612 17% 0.84 0.88 $40.47 $41.42 Master’s degree
29-1123 Physical therapists 12,340 14,296 1,956 16% 1.11 1.16 $33.15 $34.15 Master’s degree
53-2021 Air traffic controllers 1,782 2,035 253 14% 1.34 1.39 $52.24 $51.98 Long-term on-the-job training
29-1122 Occupational therapists 6,621 7,528 907 14% 1.05 1.09 $31.01 $30.90 Master’s degree
29-1081 Podiatrists 1,295 1,471 176 14% 1.06 1.18 $33.71 $39.02 First professional degree
29-1011 Chiropractors 3,676 4,150 474 13% 1.07 1.19 $31.90 $36.00 First professional degree
53-2012 Commercial pilots 3,717 4,177 460 12% 1.39 1.51 $30.85 $33.49 Postsecondary vocational award
29-1069 Physicians and surgeons 41,684 45,373 3,689 9% 0.89 0.95 $69.84 $74.00 First professional degree
29-1124 Radiation therapists 1,242 1,349 107 9% 1.42 1.43 $32.25 $35.35 Associate’s degree
29-1041 Optometrists 2,150 2,297 147 7% 0.82 0.86 $37.14 $40.20 First professional degree
29-2033 Nuclear medicine technologists 2,353 2,503 150 6% 1.90 1.96 $31.06 $31.39 Associate’s degree
53-2011 Airline pilots, copilots, and flight engineers 3,236 3,418 182 6% 0.66 0.74 $62.91 $79.12 Bachelor’s degree
Total 86538 96153 9615 0.11 51.92 55.31

  • Again, a bunch of healthcare jobs — nine out of 13 on this chart.
  • Most impressive overall growth is in physical therapists, which grew by 16% and added 2,000 jobs, and physicians & surgeons, which grew by only 9% but added nearly 4,000.
  • Nuclear medicine technologists have the greatest concentration with an LQ of 1.96 — pretty high for Florida. Commercial pilots (1.51), radiation therapists (1.43), and air traffic controllers (1.39) stand next in line.

Definitions:

Nuclear medicine technologists prepare, administer, and measure radioactive isotopes in therapeutic, diagnostic, and tracer studies utilizing a variety of radioisotope equipment. Prepare stock solutions of radioactive materials and calculate doses to be administered by radiologists. Subject patients to radiation. Execute blood volume, red cell survival, and fat absorption studies following standard laboratory techniques.

Radiation therapists provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards. Duties may include reviewing prescription and diagnosis; acting as liaison with physician and supportive care personnel; preparing equipment, such as immobilization, treatment, and protection devices; and maintaining records, reports, and files. May assist in dosimetry procedures and tumor localization.

MOST CONCENTRATED

Remember, when we look at the most concentrated jobs in Florida, we’re looking at the jobs with the greatest regional specialization — the most compelling jobs for the state. (Here, again, we apply a filter that limits us to the jobs with 1000+ employees.) At the top of the table are construction & related workers (all other) (3.64), airfield operations specialists (3.51), and ship engineers (3.16).

SOC Code Description 2007 Jobs 2011 Jobs Change % Change 2007 National Location Quotient 2011 National Location Quotient 2011 Median Hourly Wage 2011 Avg Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Complete Employment – 2011.4
47-4099 Construction and related workers, all other 17,849 11,178 (6,671) (37%) 4.38 3.64 $15.92 $16.63 Moderate-term on-the-job training
53-2022 Airfield operations specialists 1,473 1,507 34 2% 3.27 3.51 $19.78 $23.55 Long-term on-the-job training
53-5031 Ship engineers 1,986 2,056 70 4% 3.07 3.16 $29.90 $38.39 Work experience in a related field
31-9095 Pharmacy aides 7,257 6,599 (658) (9%) 2.11 2.24 $9.54 $9.68 Short-term on-the-job training
47-3016 Helpers, roofers 3,393 1,901 (1,492) (44%) 2.88 2.24 $10.98 $11.53 Short-term on-the-job training
41-3099 Sales representatives, services, all other 89,928 78,108 (11,820) (13%) 2.26 2.19 $20.57 $25.46 Work experience in a related field
15-2031 Operations research analysts 7,607 7,594 (13) 0% 2.10 2.15 $25.81 $27.33 Master’s degree
37-2021 Pest control workers 13,366 13,349 (17) 0% 2.18 2.14 $11.60 $11.89 Moderate-term on-the-job training
31-9093 Medical equipment preparers 5,837 6,085 248 4% 2.01 2.11 $11.86 $12.15 Short-term on-the-job training
39-6012 Concierges 2,533 2,578 45 2% 1.89 2.02 $10.53 $11.75 Moderate-term on-the-job training
47-3019 Helpers, construction trades, all other 4,149 2,406 (1,743) (42%) 2.49 2.01 $11.68 $12.10 Short-term on-the-job training
27-2021 Athletes and sports competitors 2,653 2,680 27 1% 1.88 2.00 $23.44 $26.61 Long-term on-the-job training
43-4181 Reservation and transportation ticket agents and travel clerks 17,879 17,078 (801) (4%) 1.88 1.98 $15.10 $15.55 Short-term on-the-job training
29-2033 Nuclear medicine technologists 2,353 2,442 89 4% 1.90 1.97 $31.06 $31.39 Associate’s degree
39-9099 Personal care and service workers, all other 17,221 17,833 612 4% 1.86 1.95 $10.81 $12.40 Short-term on-the-job training
53-5021 Captains, mates, and pilots of water vessels 4,092 4,075 (17) 0% 1.85 1.93 $23.72 $34.52 Work experience in a related field
39-3091 Amusement and recreation attendants 27,630 27,736 106 0% 1.81 1.92 $8.21 $9.20 Short-term on-the-job training
39-6011 Baggage porters and bellhops 5,607 5,571 (36) (1%) 1.77 1.90 $8.66 $10.00 Short-term on-the-job training
Total 232816 210776 -22040 -0.09 16.13 18.79

  • Four of the most concentrated jobs are related to personal care and service (SOC code 39)—not a shocker, given all the condos and resorts. And these jobs are on their way up: concierges (LQ 2.01, +99 jobs), personal care & service workers (all other) (LQ 1.93, +1,100 jobs), baggage porters & bellhops (LQ 1.90, +66 jobs), and amusement & recreation attendants (LQ 1.90, + 600 jobs).
  • Three of the jobs are related to construction and extraction (SOC code 47). But they have all slumped significantly since 2007: construction & related workers (all other) (LQ 3.60, -6,700 jobs), helpers, roofers (LQ 2.30, -1,500 jobs) and helpers, construction trades (all other) (LQ 2.01, -1,700 jobs).
  • Another three of the most concentrated jobs are related to transportation and material moving (SOC code 53). They all show moderate growth: airfield operations specialists (LQ 3.49, +55 jobs), ship engineers (LQ 3.15, +118), and captains, mates, & pilots of water vessels (LQ 1.91, +65 jobs).
  • Most of these jobs require short- or moderate-term on-the-job training, and most of them pay $8-$15 an hour. Operations research analysts is the only one that requires a master’s degree, and it pays better at $25.81. Nuclear medicine technologists requires an associate’s degree, and is the only job paying over $30 an hour.

One more definition:

Airfield operations specialists ensure the safe takeoff and landing of commercial and military aircraft. Duties include coordination between air-traffic control and maintenance personnel; dispatching; using airfield landing and navigational aids; implementing airfield safety procedures; monitoring and maintaining flight records; and applying knowledge of weather information.

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

So if we roll the three criteria together — pay, growth, concentration — what are Florida’s best jobs for 2012? Physicians & surgeons has the fattest pay check ($69.84) and notable growth (9%, nearly 4,000 new jobs since 2007). Physical therapists is also worth checking out: $33.15 an hour, 16% growth (2,000 new jobs), and an LQ of 1.16. Air traffic controllers doesn’t have as many new jobs (250), but its proportionate growth is good (14%), it pays well at $52.24 an hour, and it has reasonably good concentration for the state (1.39).

Feel free to comment below or email us with any questions. You can follow EMSI on Twitter @DesktopEcon.

2 Responses to “Top Jobs in Florida for 2012”

  1. Robert Lord

    Extremely interesting and eye-opening. Another good example of what can be done with the EMSI services. I am eager to try that same hypothesis for Mississippi and see how the state compares with Florida and the United States.

  2. Dorothy Cooper

    Many educators and parents needs to understand the potential job market and
    costs involved in career planning.

    Many universities are nothing but toilet paper degress printers and rob people of resources and produce little career assistance.

    Thanks

    Dr.C