2012′s Best-Performing Jobs for Doctoral and Professional Degrees

This is the fifth post in a series about the best jobs by ed level for 2012. See the original post here. Keep in mind that the 2012 data is a projection.

In this post we want to highlight the fastest-growing and highest-paying jobs that require a doctoral or first professional degree. Our analysis is based solely on labor market data from EMSI’s 2012.1 Covered Employment release, which is drawn from over 80 state and federal data sources. We use Analyst, EMSI’s web-based labor market analysis tool, to assemble and filter this data. The tool contains detailed information on over 1,100 industries and 800 occupations.

Most New Jobs

  • Postsecondary teachers gained 80,000 new jobs from 2008-2012.
  • Physicians & surgeons gained 23,000,
  • Family & general practitioners gained 15,000, and
  • Medical scientists gained 8,300.

As it turns out, most of the occupations here are healthcare related (SOC code 29).

SOC Code Description 2008 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change % Change 2011 Median Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Covered Employment – 2012.1
25-1099 Postsecondary teachers 1,350,163 1,429,455 79,292 6% $30.84 Doctoral degree
29-1069 Physicians and Surgeons, All Other 262,635 285,554 22,919 9% $81.53 First professional degree
29-1062 Family and General Practitioners 94,503 109,518 15,015 16% $77.21 First professional degree
19-1042 Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists 99,470 107,816 8,346 8% $36.47 Doctoral degree
29-1022 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 4,881 9,927 5,046 103% $86.30 First professional degree
19-3031 Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists 94,799 98,785 3,986 4% $32.36 Doctoral degree
29-1061 Anesthesiologists 35,654 39,518 3,864 11% $86.89 First professional degree
29-1021 Dentists, General 84,695 88,556 3,861 5% $68.61 First professional degree
29-1131 Veterinarians 53,094 56,748 3,654 7% $39.22 First professional degree
29-1067 Surgeons 42,588 46,100 3,512 8% $89.19 First professional degree

Fastest Growth

Here we have the jobs that have bulked up the most proportionately speaking.

  • Oral & maxillofacial surgeons grew by an impressive 103% since 2008.
  • The rest can’t even touch that: family & general practitioners (16%), obstetricians & gynecologists (14%), anesthesiologists (11%), and pediatricians (11%). Note again the dominance of healthcare jobs.

SOC Code Description 2008 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change % Change 2011 Median Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Covered Employment – 2012.1
29-1022 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 4,881 9,927 5,046 103% $86.30 First professional degree
29-1062 Family and General Practitioners 94,503 109,518 15,015 16% $77.21 First professional degree
29-1064 Obstetricians and Gynecologists 19,255 21,945 2,690 14% $83.69 First professional degree
29-1061 Anesthesiologists 35,654 39,518 3,864 11% $86.89 First professional degree
29-1065 Pediatricians, General 27,951 30,891 2,940 11% $72.39 First professional degree
29-1041 Optometrists 26,137 28,805 2,668 10% $45.60 First professional degree
19-2011 Astronomers 1,211 1,326 115 9% $52.95 Doctoral degree
29-1069 Physicians and Surgeons, All Other 262,635 285,554 22,919 9% $81.53 First professional degree
29-1029 Dentists, All Other Specialists 5,504 5,970 466 8% $74.77 First professional degree
15-2021 Mathematicians 3,181 3,448 267 8% $44.73 Doctoral degree
19-1042 Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists 99,470 107,816 8,346 8% $36.47 Doctoral degree
29-1067 Surgeons 42,588 46,100 3,512 8% $89.19 First professional degree

Highest Paying

Again, lots of health care jobs. Of all the occupations that make more than $70 an hour (2011 median hourly wage), surgeons is the highest ($89.19), followed closely by anesthesiologists ($86.89), oral & maxillofacial surgeons ($86.30), and obstetricians & gynecologists ($83.69).

SOC Code Description 2008 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change % Change 2011 Median Hourly Wage Education Level
Source: EMSI Covered Employment – 2012.1
29-1067 Surgeons 42,588 46,100 3,512 8% $89.19 First professional degree
29-1061 Anesthesiologists 35,654 39,518 3,864 11% $86.89 First professional degree
29-1022 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 4,881 9,927 5,046 103% $86.30 First professional degree
29-1064 Obstetricians and Gynecologists 19,255 21,945 2,690 14% $83.69 First professional degree
29-1023 Orthodontists 5,230 5,588 358 7% $83.18 First professional degree
29-1063 Internists, General 47,339 50,259 2,920 6% $81.87 First professional degree
29-1069 Physicians and Surgeons, All Other 262,635 285,554 22,919 9% $81.53 First professional degree
29-1066 Psychiatrists 21,546 22,982 1,436 7% $78.50 First professional degree
29-1062 Family and General Practitioners 94,503 109,518 15,015 16% $77.21 First professional degree
29-1029 Dentists, All Other Specialists 5,504 5,970 466 8% $74.77 First professional degree
29-1065 Pediatricians, General 27,951 30,891 2,940 11% $72.39 First professional degree

The Upshot

Taking growth and wages together, which of these super-high higher-ed jobs are performing the best? Oral & maxillofacial surgeons, physicians & surgeons, family & general practitioners are the most notable on both levels.

Return to the original post here.

Find out more about EMSI and our data here. You can reach us via Twitter @DesktopEcon or by emailing Rob Sentz (rob@economicmodeling.com).

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